Steal My Idea: Too Much Table Talk? Ideas to Encourage Role-Playing and Staying in Character

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[Illustration courtesy of Pixabay.com]
Table talk (discussing what to do as players) is great, but too much of it can squash a good campaign. It’s easy to slip into using player knowledge about the mechanics or content of the material to deduce the best solution for the situation knowing things their characters would never know. Unfortunately, it cheapens the game, both for the players and the GM. It’s something I sometimes do as a player as well, so I wanted to share some methods that both players and GMs can do to help make role playing more integrated into the game itself.Recently, a friend asked me if I had any ideas to help encourage or reward role-playing, so I wanted to share it with everyone. Continue reading “Steal My Idea: Too Much Table Talk? Ideas to Encourage Role-Playing and Staying in Character”

Steal My Idea: 3 Curses Your Players Won’t Expect

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Image provided by Pixabay.com

When playing a tabletop RPG, especially one with a familiar system or world, it can be hard to surprise your players. Many people know what a mind flayer does or how barbarian rage works or what a basilisk’s gaze will do to your complexion. I love creating new content to throw my players off. Curses, I’ve found, are a great way to add some misfortune and ratchet up the tension by introducing something they didn’t expect and cannot necessarily predict. Continue reading “Steal My Idea: 3 Curses Your Players Won’t Expect”

Steal My Idea: Occam’s Razor and Arkham’s Razor (Part One)

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Picture courtesy of pixabay.com.

I created two incredibly powerful weapons for the story of one of my campaigns to revolve around.

 

The first weapon was Occam’s Razor. It was a wickedly sharp sword, and the legend said the wielder could bend reality to her will (twice a day), so long as what she wished to happen made logical sense and didn’t require too many assumptions. If a character wanted to go somewhere, she could hold Occam’s Razor and explain how she could get a ride. She couldn’t say “I wish a helicopter would come down from the sky and pick us up” but the character could say “That nice nun with the twin pistols who drives the church van (an established NPC in that campaign) lives around here. It would make sense if we saw her driving by.” Continue reading “Steal My Idea: Occam’s Razor and Arkham’s Razor (Part One)”

Steal My Idea: How to Successfully Poison Your Players

Poison rules in D&D 3.X are a bit weird, but also kind of cool. If a poisoningattack (a scorpion’s stinger, a poisoned-coated sword, etc.) beats a creature’s or character’s AC, they have to make a fort save against the poison. If they succeed, they are immune to that kind of poison for twenty-four hours. That’s kind of boss when you think about it, and it makes your character seem like a total badass. Continue reading “Steal My Idea: How to Successfully Poison Your Players”

Steal My Idea: You’re Going to Drown. Just Kidding! You’re on Fire (An Unexpeted Trap to Use in Your D&D Campaign)

With a few personal tweaks, you can use this trope-twisting trap in pretty much any setting or time period that has traps (a dungeon, a secret lab, etc.)(fantasy, modern, future, etc). I used it in a fantasy setting. Continue reading “Steal My Idea: You’re Going to Drown. Just Kidding! You’re on Fire (An Unexpeted Trap to Use in Your D&D Campaign)”

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